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Whether you’re trying to get the house presentable for the holidays, you want to get your kids into better cleaning habits, or you’re just trying to get rid of some of the extra stuff they don’t use anymore, decluttering a kid’s room can be a challenge unto itself.

You might think it would be easy enough – find the clothes they’ve grown out of, stack up the toys they don’t play with anymore, and haul it all out of there. But there’s a big difference between just pitching stuff out and actually decluttering, and then there’s the issue of needing to find storage for everything you’ve still got left over.

If you’ve been faced with this, or similar situations in your kids’ rooms lately, here’s a few of our favorite children’s bedroom storage ideas:

 

Get your kids involved: Above and beyond any other sort of decluttering strategy you might find, one of the most productive and helpful will be to get your kids involved throughout the entire process. The only room in a house that gives your kids any sense of ownership is their bedroom, and including them throughout the process will go a long way towards helping them feel better about the whole thing. Besides, this is the perfect chance for them to impress you with their toy and video game collections, and that’s all any kid wants, really.

 

Start from the bottom up: Kids, especially younger ones, have a much lower view of their room than you do. And we do mean that literally, as their height and age mean they’ll focus more on the areas they can most easily access. Think about the things within their reach: will they be able to use their own bedroom dresser? If you’re using closet organizers, are they low enough to the ground for them to reach without mom and dad’s help? You’ll need to take a child’s-eye-view of things in their room to make it the most helpful for everyone, but the time spent will be worth it.

 

Help them understand where it’s all going: By meeting kids at their level, they can get a better overall understanding of what it means to organize and declutter things. If they have a sweater they call their favorite, or if they have a toy that they keep referring to by name, then you know it has some greater meaning to them than some of the other stuff in their room. Explain to them what decluttering is, how it can help other kids (because most toys can still be donated to a thrift store or resale shop), and how it will make their rooms more clean – or at least give them room for more toys – without having to get rid of the stuff that truly matters to them.

 

Store like with like: Any given kids’ room is probably going to be a mess of toys, clothes, books, and electronic devices in a series of piles around the room. Whatever your organization system winds up being, try to get your kids (and yourself!) in the habit of keeping things in designated areas. Whether you’re using dressers, wall shelves, closet shelves, or any other kind of storage supplies, make sure that things are organized logically by what they are and what they do – clothes with clothes, soft toys with soft toys, video games and devices by themselves (and near the appropriate charger), and so on.

 

Establish routines: This can be the hardest part, but getting your kids into the habit of keeping their stuff in specific areas can solve a lot of problems down the road. A lot of families use colored storage bins to help devise a color-coded system; backpacks and school supplies in one bin, favorite toys in the other, and so on. Establishing these habits for your kids can prevent a bigger mess down the road, and can make the next round of decluttering go by that much more quickly.

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